From Big Org to Opencast – Nick’s Story


In this blog, we tell the story of one of our agile BAs joining Opencast, how he felt his career was at a standstill and how moving from a large, grade-based organisation to Opencast opened up new opportunities.

“After 14 years in a big organisation, moving to an SME consultancy was something that was well outside my comfort zone but on reflection, is one the best decisions I have ever made.

So where do the differences begin? Well, they start at the beginning: recruitment. Going from a long, convoluted process that takes weeks/months to one where being interviewed and offered the post inside 2 weeks was amazing. There’s no room for bureaucracy at Opencast and this is reflected how they recruit people. There’s not an endless trail of emails between post holders, applicants and the resource department. You deal with one or two people from start to finish.

So, after accepting, I began working with one of their clients where several other Opencast employees worked. I was personally introduced to everyone and was taken for lunch as a way to meet my new colleagues. With those niceties over, it was time to get to work. And this is where I saw probably the biggest difference.

From day one, Opencast trusted me as a Business Analyst. I was trusted to work effectively with the client, provide them with my expertise, knowledge and skills as a BA. I wasn’t given performance targets or work objectives to meet along with those boring (mainly pointless) monthly 1-2-1s to review my progress against targets.

They feel that as a specialist, you should know what ‘good performance’ is, regardless of your role. This approach makes you feel solely responsible for how you carry out your role and how much value you bring. This is quite an enlightening feeling after spending what must be 100s of hours over the years being told what to do to ‘get better’ at my job. If you’ve ever worked for a large, grade-based organisation, you’ll know how painful that process is. Here, I can sort out my own training for my own ambitions and I can talk when I want to.

Being made to feel welcome at Opencast is one of our biggest attributes I believe and is at the foundation……the staff are the main asset. I’ve felt this feeling of being part of a team, with Opencast t-shirts, mugs and lanyards along with various team events throughout the year. There are absolutely no heirs and graces at Opencast and everyone you speak to whether they are based with clients or in the office at Hoult’s Yard, they always greet you with a smile and genuinely pleased to see you. After all, you’re part of the Opencast family!

So, I am now one of ‘the’ BAs at Opencast, not just ‘a’ BA, I now feel I am respected by my colleagues for my skills, knowledge and experience as a Business Analyst and not by what someone who ‘thinks’ they know what a Business Analyst is/does.

Everyone else at Opencast are specialists at what they do too, they are not ‘9 to 5’ people. They strive to get better in their role and are constantly learning new practices whether that be by attending role specific seminars or community events.

And finally….

If, like me, you find yourself at a bit of a crossroads in your BA career and you’re not sure what to do, don’t think it’s the end of the road. It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been with an organisation. If you feel like you’re not getting anywhere, get out. Don’t let your current circumstances stop you from being a great BA (if that’s what you want to be). If it takes a leap of faith to join Opencast Software, then weigh up your options and go for it. After all, this is your future we’re talking about here and there’s more to life out there.”

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